Italian Studies

Events & Activities

Events & Activities
The Italian Studies program organizes several activites: here you can check out our events calendar and catch a glimpse of the life of the department. Italian film nights, visiting authors and filmmakers, lectures and schedule for language table can all be found here.

Contact Us

Franco Baldasso
Tel:
845-758-7377
Email: baldasso@bard.edu
Office Hours: Tues. 2:30 - 4:30 and by appt.

Current and Upcoming Events

There are no current or upcoming events scheduled.

Italian Events Archive by Year

                      

2017

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Shelleen Greene, ‘96
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

​“After the Revolution: Reading the Italian-Libyan Political Constellation through the Afrosurrealist Imaginary”
Olin, Room 203  6:30 pm
A lecture on Kevin Jerome Everson’s Rhinoceros (2013), an imagined staging of the last speech of the first Duke of Florence, Alessandro de’ Medici (1510-1537), also known as the first black European head of state due to his mixed Italian and African ancestry.

This event is co-sponsored by Africana Studies, Art History, Film Studies, and the Office of Alumni/ae Affairs
Sponsored by: Italian Studies Program
Contact: Sara Marzioli  845-758-7201  smarzioli@bard.edu
Monday, February 27, 2017

The Italians ... and the challenges of
writing about them

John Hooper, Italy correspondent of The Economist magazine and the author of The Italians (Viking, 2015 & 2016)
RKC 103  5:00 pm
How did a nation that spawned the Renaissance also produce the Mafia? What exactly is bella figura? And why do Romans eat their gnocchi on Thursdays? Having spent more than 15 years reporting on Italy, John Hooper set out to write a book that answers these and many of the other puzzles that confront outsiders in a society that can be as baffling as it is alluring.  The result is The Italians, published by Viking, which has featured in the bestseller lists of The Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times. In his talk, Hooper will discuss the challenges and rewards of trying to explain a society in which paradox is the norm and in which much is hidden, or coded or left unsaid.
Sponsored by: Division of Social Studies; Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Italian Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Joseph Luzzi  845-758-7150  jluzzi@bard.edu